When In Deep Water, Become A Diver - by Cameron Daddo

“When in deep water, become a diver”

We are certainly in uncharted waters right now. In any generation, events occur both profound and life changing that forge our character. Our parents and their parents had two world wars and the Great Depression. We’re now experiencing Coronavirus.   

I have come to understand that the only thing we can be assured of is change, and when things are difficult or we’re challenged with the upheavals life brings, struggling can often make things worse. 

Trying to swim out of a rip, or fighting your way to the surface is sometimes not an option. Knowing when to accept change and embrace all that comes with it is part of life, it’s part of our growth in this human form. 

Sometimes it’s best to ignore our habitual responses and in doing so make an opposite choice. To be curious, to lean into what we are avoiding.  There are gifts to discover in the deep and though to some, making the choice to avoid the conflict can represent failure and loss, however in many cases, it often leads to the opposite, victory and gain.

I have found, there is no ending or change without some kind of re-birth! Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca's’ quote, “every new beginning comes from some other beginnings end” sums this up.  We are surrounded by examples of cycles- the winter must end for there to be spring flowers and the cycle of pregnancy ends with the miracle of birth. 

The challenges we face build resilience and strength. Without resistance and tension, bridges would fall down. Our challenges are a natural part of life. The choice we have is, how we view the uncomfortable. We get to choose if it’s happening to us or for us, and then we choose how we respond and take action based on that which feels best.  

I know for me, choosing to “accept and allow”, gives me the space and time i need to make conscious choices based on my best intentions for what I want my life to be, and I am not left exhausted fighting a battle that’s sometimes unwinnable.

So have courage next time, (and there will plenty of next times), "when in deep water, become a diver."